An analysis of the wife of bath in chaucers canterbury tales

The pilgrim who narrates this tale, Alison, is a gap-toothed, partially deaf seamstress and widow who has been married five times. She claims to have great experience in the ways of the heart, having a remedy for whatever might ail it. Throughout her story, I was shocked, yet pleased to encounter details which were rather uncharacteristic of the women of Chaucer's time.

An analysis of the wife of bath in chaucers canterbury tales

First of all, the Wife is the forerunner of the modern liberated woman, and she is the prototype of a certain female figure that often appears in later literature. Her doctrine on marriage is shocking to her companions, evoking such responses that the single man never wants to marry.

The Wife of Bath's Prologue and Tale

For the Clerk and the Parson, her views are not only scandalous but heretical; they contradict the teachings of the church.

Her prologue presents a view of marriage that no pilgrim had ever conceived of and is followed by a tale that proves her to be correct. She expresses her views with infinite zest and conviction, with such determined assurance in the correctness that no pilgrim can argue with her logic; they can be shocked by it, but they cannot refute it.

An analysis of the wife of bath in chaucers canterbury tales

As she unfolds her life history in her prologue, she reveals that the head of the house should always be the woman, that a man is no match for a woman, and that as soon as they learn to yield to the sovereignty of women, men will find a happy marriage.

In her prologue, the Wife admirably supports her position by reference to all sort of scholarly learning, and when some source of authority disagrees with her point of view, she dismisses it and relies instead on her own experience.

Because she has had the experience of having had five husbands — and is receptive to a sixth — there is no better proof of her views than her own experience, which is better than a scholarly diatribe.A summary of The Wife of Bath’s Tale in Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales.

Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of The Canterbury Tales and what it means.

The Canterbury Tales: The Wife of Bath's Prologue Analysis First of all, the Wife is the forerunner of the modern liberated woman, and she is the prototype of a certain female figure that often appears in later literature.
SparkNotes: The Canterbury Tales: The Wife of Bath’s Tale Synopsis[ edit ] There was a knight in King Arthur 's time who raped a fair young maiden.
From the SparkNotes Blog Since her first marriage at the tender age of twelve, she has had five husbands. She says that many people have criticized her for her numerous marriages, most of them on the basis that Christ went only once to a wedding, at Cana in Galilee.
During what century did Chaucer live? Summary Analysis The Wife of Bath announces that she is an authority on marriage because of her experience, having had five husbands.
SparkNotes: The Canterbury Tales: The Wife of Bath’s Prologue The Wife of Bath begins her lengthy prologue by announcing that she has always followed the rule of experience rather than authority. Having already had five husbands "at the church door," she has experience enough to make her an expert.

Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans. Nov 29,  · The Canterbury Tales summary and analysis in under five minutes. Geoffery Chaucer's classic anthology of stories is perhaps the most famous piece of Middle English literature.

The Wife of Bath

'The Wife of Bath's Tale' is one of the stories written by author Geoffrey Chaucer in 'The Canterbury Tales.' Learn more about 'The Wife of Bath's Tale' and test your knowledge with a quiz. Chaucer's Wife of Bath. Perhaps the best-known pilgrim in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales is Alisoun, the Wife of Bath.

An analysis of the wife of bath in chaucers canterbury tales

The Wife's fame derives from Chaucer's deft characterization of her as a brassy, bawdy woman—the very antithesis of virtuous womanhood—who . The Canterbury Tales is the last of Geoffrey Chaucer's works, and he only finished 24 of an initially planned tales.

The Canterbury Tales study guide contains a biography of Geoffrey Chaucer, literature essays, a complete e-text, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis.

The Canterbury Tales is the last of Geoffrey Chaucer's works, and he only finished 24 of an initially planned tales. The Canterbury Tales study guide contains a biography of Geoffrey Chaucer, literature essays, a complete e-text, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis.

The Wife of Bath